Google+
Bombardier | CARRY-ON

Category / Bombardier

Carry-on’s top 13 of 2013.

2013 was exceptional proof that aviation is far from sclerotic. Beginning with continued fixation on the 787 as Boeing’s amour propre was tested by further incidents and a grounding. Eyes turned skyward for the equal greatest number of first flights in history. Rarely appreciating the continued challenging conditions airlines and the industry faces, politicians continued to provide opaque interference, compounding an already fractured dichotomy. There was awe as the world’s largest airline was replaced with with an even larger carrier, rosy profit turnarounds turned into sickening loss projections, and a renewed geopolitical rivalry in everything from aerospace manufacturing to air traffic rights. Here’s our 13 of 2013:

1. The 787.

The most exciting new aircraft in years became known for one thing in 2013: fire. In January the worldwide fleet was grounded – only the second aircraft since the DC-10 to be grounded in this way – following a series of electrical faults and battery fires caused by thermal runaway. The batteries were pulled out, boxed, and additional venting at a cost of approximately $500,000 per aircraft. Back in the air confidence has grown, the 787-9 is now flying and there has only been a small fiery issue relating to a locator beacon. Image: Richard Deakin.

 

2. CSeries flies.

110 years later Bombardier did it again for the very first time. This time with the first completely new narrow-body design since the A320 family.

 

3. ICAO’s emissions agreement.

ICAO’s member states reached a landmark multilateral agreement to develop a market-based measure that would reduce carbon emissions by 2020. The agreement will allow countries and airlines to operate under a single global standard rather than competing carbon regimes. Governments’ individual plans will be approved at the next assembly in 2016.

 

 

 

 

Continue reading “Carry-on’s top 13 of 2013.” »

QantasLink's 14th B717

Qantas’ 14th 717 is on its way to Australia.

Qantas’ 14th Boeing 717 and first aircraft to be configured in a domestic two-class configuration is on its way to Australia. After technical acceptance of the aircraft in the US earlier this week, the aircraft is currently scheduled to arrive in Adelaide on Friday for final acceptance by Cobham.

Rescued from the Californian desert, the aircraft was previously operated by Midwest Airlines, and more recently Mexicana Click but has been in storage in the US since Mexicana went bankrupt in 2010. The delivery flight is being undertaken under the aircraft’s US registration N406BC, with the aircraft to be registered VH-YQS upon arrival in Australia.

Continue reading “Qantas’ 14th 717 is on its way to Australia.” »